Senior Fellows

Ian Crowe, M.A. (Oxon), M. Litt, Ph.D. Associate Professor of History, Brewton-Parker College, Mount Vernon, Georgia
Director, The Edmund Burke Society of America
Bruce P. Frohnen, J.D., Ph.D. Professor of Law, Ohio Northern University College of Law
Vigen Guroian, Ph.D. Professor of Religious Studies (Eastern Christianity), University of Virginia
George H. Nash, Ph.D. Historian, South Hadley, Massachusetts
James E. Person, Jr. Publishing manager, writer, and editor at large, Northville, Michigan
Marco Respinti Journalist
Director, Centro Studi Russell Kirk, Milan, Italy
Gleaves Whitney Director, The Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, Michigan

The moral imagination is the principal possession that man does not share with the beasts. It is man’s power to perceive ethical truth, abiding law, in the seeming chaos of many events. Without the moral imagination, man would live merely day to day, or rather moment to moment, as dogs do. It is the strange faculty—inexplicable if men are assumed to have an animal nature only—of discerning greatness, justice, and order, beyond the bars of appetite and self-interest.

Russell Kirk, Enemies of the Permanent Things, 1969

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Highlights

Russell Kirk as a Midwestern Writer

A panel on “Russell Kirk as a Midwestern Writer”  took place at the annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature on June 2, 2015 at Michigan State University. Jon Lauck was the moderator and presentations were made by Gleaves Whitney, James Person and James Seaton. The session was recorded and is available here.

Jul 2015

Spring Newsletter

The latest number of the Russell Kirk Center newsletter (Spring 2015) has just been posted. It features news on the recent Edmund Burke Society conference and other recent visitors and scholars at the Kirk Center. You can download it, and past issues, here.

Jun 2015

ISI video draws on Kirk’s thought

The Intercollegiate Review has published a short video with Robert Reilly that was shot at Mecosta last summer. In it, Bob Reilly draws on Russell Kirk’s The Roots of American Order to explain why “America is older than you think.” The video is just two minutes long, but Bob manages to give a thoughtful introduction to three of the four cities: Jerusalem, Athens, and Rome.

Apr 2015