The University Bookman

 
 

Summer 2011

Editor’s Note

Pressing On

This summer saw the passing of Otto von Habsburg, a living embodiment—perhaps the last such—of the European order swept away by the Great War. We have included a fitting tribute to the Archduke—whose son, Karl, studied with Russell Kirk as a Wilbur Fellow—by Denis Kitzinger.

After six months of publishing exclusively online, the Bookman has built up a sizable archive of both new and classic pieces. Just this week we have a review of Francis Cardinal George’s new book and a classic piece by Jeffrey Hart. Please browse through those articles or reviews you might have missed—including our debate on the future of poetry (with Eugene Schlanger and Mark Anthony Signorelli), Craig Bernthal’s Newman, and the legacy of the Southern Critics by Tobias Lanz.

We have more to come this summer, including reviews of books on the Enlightenment, judicial tyranny, and the work of Anthony Esolen. Please follow us on Twitter and join the new Russell Kirk Center page on Facebook.

Have a great summer.  

Gerald J. Russello

Posted: July 10, 2011 in Editor’s Notes.

Did you see this one?

Protestantism and the Western Legal Tradition
Bruce Frohnen
Volume 45, Number 1 (Winter 2007)

Imagination it is that shapes society—moral imagination, or idyllic imagination, or diabolic imagination.

Russell Kirk

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News

The University Bookman is joining Fordham University in hosting the award-winning poet and critic A. M. Juster on Monday, February 6, 2017 at 6:00pm on Fordham’s Lincoln Center campus (McMahon Hall, Rm. 109; use the entrance on West 60th Street and Columbus Avenue in Manhattan). Juster will speak on “Riddles, Elegies, and Satires: Adventures in Translation.” The event is free and open to the public and registration is not required. We are also planning a second event in May on the humanities. Watch this space for more details. (27 Dec 2016)

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