The University Bookman

 
 

Volume 47, Number 1 (Winter 2010)

Editor’s Note

A New Era for the Bookman

We apologize for the lack of the Bookman these past months, and we deeply regret any inconvenience our absence has caused. Fundraising and operational difficulties have prevented us from maintaining our usual production schedule, which the financial crisis only exacerbated.

These difficulties, however, have led the Bookman to some conclusions about where we should next take our journal. Given that most of our costs are directly associated with printing and distributing the journal, the Board has decided to expand our web presence at the Kirk Center site and cease publishing the hard copy editions in 2010. There will be one additional hard-copy issue after this, but subsequently we expect all Bookman copy to be available only on our website.

With this issue, the Bookman enters its fiftieth year of publishing thoughtful, wide-ranging reviews for a generalist readership. It is a heritage of which all of us should be proud, as it records in a unique way a half-century of conservative reflection. But as that audience has now migrated mostly to online publications, we believe focusing more on our online content will help us to continue to reach those general readers and to make the greatest impact. Expect the usual selection of reviews, plus more timely notices, more interviews and symposia, and other features on the website.

And the reviews contained in this issue continue the Bookman tradition. Our reviews range from the (arguably parlous) state of the legal profession to the triumph of pianarchy, and include looks at two very different historians, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., and Carlton Hayes. Glen Sproviero gives us an analysis of Brian Anderson’s important book on democratic capitalism, and William Anthony Hay looks at Paul Gottfried’s latest effort at defining the Right. Given the challenges to conservatism after the Iraq War and the election of a liberal President, discussion of such books remains of importance, and central to the Bookman’s mission.

Russell Kirk liked to quote Burke to the effect that change is the means to our preservation. I hope he would understand the need for this change if the Bookman is to continue its important work.

Many thanks for your continued support.

Gerald J. Russello

Posted: April 5, 2010 in Editor’s Notes.

Real progress consists in the movement of mankind toward the understanding of norms, and toward conformity to norms. Real decadence consists in the movement of mankind away from the understanding of norms, and away from obedience to norms.

Russell Kirk, Enemies of the Permanent Things, 1969

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The Edmund Burke Society of America is pleased to announce a call for papers and open registration for “Edmund Burke and Patriotism,” their third conference on Edmund Burke. It will be held on February 27 and 28, 2015 at Villanova University. Keynote addresses will be from David Bromwich, Michael Brown, and Regina Janes. Please see this link for details and to register. (27 Aug 2014)

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