The University Bookman

 
 

Volume 34, Number 2 (Fall 1994)

Contents

Editor’s Note: A Tribute to Russell Kirk

Essay 8 October 2000
The Splendor of Dedication
by Eugene V. Clark
Best of the Bookman 2 October 2011
Knight of Truth
by Gerhart Niemeyer
A eulogy for Russell Kirk.
Best of the Bookman 9 October 2011
Russell Kirk: An Appreciation
by Andrew Shaughnessy
Another essay from our 1994 memorial issue. Human nature, as Kirk reminded us, is a constant.
Best of the Bookman 16 October 2011
An Augustine for Our Age
by Jeffrey O. Nelson
A memorial to Russell Kirk from our 1994 tribute edition, from one of Dr. Kirk's personal assistants.
Best of the Bookman 23 October 2011
Death of a Giant
by William A. Rusher
Another tribute to Dr. Kirk from our memorial issue. The former publisher of National Review explains the difference between conservatism and “classical liberalism” and Kirk’s irreplaceable role in intellectual history.
Best of the Bookman 30 October 2011
Mr. Conservative
by Frederick D. Wilhelmsen
In this excerpt from our memorial issue, the legendary professor of philosophy from the University of Dallas offers an homage to his friend Russell Kirk.
Best of the Bookman 6 November 2011
The Youthful Writings of Russell Kirk
by Matthew Davis
In this article from our memorial issue, one of Russell Kirk’s assistants reviews his juvenalia and points out continuities with his mature work.
Best of the Bookman 13 November 2011
A Literary Patrimony
by Cecilia Kirk Nelson
In this article from our 1994 Memorial issue, Russell Kirk's daughter Cecilia discusses the literary heritage that she was given by Kirk’s regular evening readings.
Best of the Bookman 7 October 2012
book cover Rediscovering a Neglected Conservative Mind
by W. Wesley McDonald
Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, by James Fitzjames Stephen. Edited by Stuart D. Warner. Liberty Fund, Inc., 1993 xxix + 270 pp., $19.50 cloth; $7.50, paper.

Also in this Issue

On the Passing of Dr. Russell Kirk
Statement by Governor John Engler

Michigan Senate Resolution
Offered by Senator Joanne Emmons

Is Life Worth Living?
Epilogue from Russell Kirk’s Memoirs

A Note On Russell Kirk

The moral imagination is the principal possession that man does not share with the beasts. It is man’s power to perceive ethical truth, abiding law, in the seeming chaos of many events. Without the moral imagination, man would live merely day to day, or rather moment to moment, as dogs do. It is the strange faculty—inexplicable if men are assumed to have an animal nature only—of discerning greatness, justice, and order, beyond the bars of appetite and self-interest.

Russell Kirk, Enemies of the Permanent Things, 1969

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In honor of the great historian John Lukacs, who turns ninety in 2014, we are delighted to announce publication of the first e-book from the University Bookman. The Bookman on John Lukacs features essays and reviews by and about Lukacs gathered from fifty years of our archives. This convenient collection of scholarship is available as a Kindle edition from Amazon.com. (15 Feb 2014)

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