The University Bookman

 
 

Volume 3, Number 1 (Autumn 1962)

Contents

Best of the Bookman 27 March 2011
The Dark Ages of the Enlightenment
by Peter J. Stanlis
In this “Best of the Bookman” essay from 1962, Peter J. Stanlis looks at a book on the thinking of the Enlightenment and its consequences for the present age. “In our time, as never before since Descartes, unbounded faith in the methodology of physical science in human affairs has become an end in itself.”
Best of the Bookman 14 January 2012
Memo to Irving Babbitt
by John Abbot Clark
In this Best of the Bookman essay from 1962, a writer who was then an associate professor of English at Michigan State, wrote a letter to Irving Babbitt, who died in 1933, assessing the state of education and culture in light of Babbit’s concerns during his lifetime.
Best of the Bookman 22 January 2012
book cover A New ‘Rasselas’
by Jeffrey Hart
The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia, by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Warren Fleischauer. New York: Barron’s Educational Series, Inc., 1962. 189 pp. [Edition reviewed; Penguin edition (Kindle); Free edition (Kindle)]

All great systems, ethical or political, attain their ascendency over the minds of men by virtue of their appeal to the imagination; and when they cease to touch the chords of wonder and mystery and hope, their power is lost, and men look elsewhere for some set of principles by which they may be guided.

Russell Kirk

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News

The University Bookman is joining Fordham University in hosting the award-winning poet and critic A. M. Juster on Monday, February 6, 2017 at 6:00pm on Fordham’s Lincoln Center campus (McMahon Hall, Rm. 109; use the entrance on West 60th Street and Columbus Avenue in Manhattan). Juster will speak on “Riddles, Elegies, and Satires: Adventures in Translation.” The event is free and open to the public and registration is not required. We are also planning a second event in May on the humanities. Watch this space for more details. (27 Dec 2016)

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