The University Bookman

Best of the Bookman 24 April 2011
Discerning of Spirits
George A. Panichas
In this review from our archives, the late Dr. Panichas reviews a book on the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky and addresses reasons the great writer is misunderstood in the modern age.
Review 17 April 2011
book cover Tyranny of the Herd
Paul Beston
Bernard Iddings Bell’s Crowd Culture turned a withering eye on American conformity.
Best of the Bookman 17 April 2011
book cover America’s Fin de Siècle: End of a Century or a Civilization?
Gleaves Whitney
Is our culture terminally decadent? In this “Best of the Bookman” essay from 1990, Gleaves Whitney looks at a collection of essays by Jacques Barzun on the status of American culture. It seems to have held up well in the twenty-plus years since its release.
Interview 10 April 2011
book cover A Return to Reason
an interview by Gerald J. Russello
A conversation with Robert Royal, president of the Faith & Reason Institute in Washington D.C. and author of The God That Did Not Fail on the place of the Catholic and Catholic teaching in American public life.
Best of the Bookman 10 April 2011
The Enduring Brownson
Peter J. Stanlis
In this “Best of the Bookman” essay from 1993, Peter J. Stanlis looks at a book on the nineteenth century thinker Orestes Brownson and his conception of “the American Spirit.”
Editorial 3 April 2011
Editor’s Note: Taking Stock
Review 3 April 2011
book cover Santayana’s Liberty
David A. Dilworth
The Genteel Tradition in American Philosophy and Character and Opinion in the United States by George Santayana, edited by James Seaton. Yale University Press, 2009. Paper, 240 pp. $16.
Best of the Bookman 3 April 2011
Modern Flaws and Lasting Norms
Nicholas Joost
In this “Best of the Bookman” essay from 1969, Dr. Nicholas Joost reviews Russell Kirk’s Enemies of the Permanent Things. Readers interested in history and literature will be interested in the tone as much as his fascinating treatment of Kirk’s theme.
On Essays and Letters 27 March 2011
book cover On What Knowledge Pertains To
James V. Schall, S.J.
Father Schall returns to Plato’s Republic for a discussion of the connection of knowledge, philosophy, and action—and a train of thought that points beyond ourselves. We did not cause the beauty and the very existence of what is. . . .
Best of the Bookman 27 March 2011
The Dark Ages of the Enlightenment
Peter J. Stanlis
In this “Best of the Bookman” essay from 1962, Peter J. Stanlis looks at a book on the thinking of the Enlightenment and its consequences for the present age. “In our time, as never before since Descartes, unbounded faith in the methodology of physical science in human affairs has become an end in itself.”
Review 20 March 2011
book cover Significance and Missteps
Adam Schwartz
Adam Schwartz looks at a recent intellectual biography of G. K. Chesterton that breaks new ground in the field, but also makes some significant missteps in interpretation.
Best of the Bookman 20 March 2011
book cover Wilhelm Roepke and the ‘Third Road’
Patrick M. Boarman
In this “Best of the Bookman” essay from 1977, Patrick Boarman presents a survey of the writings of Wilhelm Roepke (1899–1966), the German economist and antitotalitarian. He presents Roepke as a defender of the free market system but with a clear understanding of its limits—as a central twentieth century proponent, in fact, of a humane economy.
Interview 13 March 2011
book cover Democracy’s Immoderate Friends
an interview by Gerald J. Russello
A conversation with Daniel J. Mahoney, professor of political science at Assumption College and author of The Conservative Foundations of the Liberal Order, a new book that traces the intellectual history of democracy, and how its success may in fact rest on non-democratic values and norms developed in the Western tradition.
Best of the Bookman 13 March 2011
The Merging of Cultures
Gerhart Niemeyer
This review essay from 1975 from the late Notre Dame professor of political scientist looks at the historic role of Westernization in Russia and China. Did the importation or imposition of semirationality lead to the fall of these great cultures to totalitarianism?

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The twentieth-century conservative is concerned, first of all, with the regeneration of the spirit and character—with the perennial problem of the inner order of the soul, the restoration of the ethical understanding, and the religious sanction upon which any life worth living is founded. This is conservatism at the highest.

Russell Kirk


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We are pleased to announce the release of The University Bookman on Edmund Burke, now available for Kindle. Collecting 21 reviews, essays, and interviews from the Bookman on the life and thought of Edmund Burke, this book is only $2.99, and purchases support our ongoing work to provide an imaginative defense of the Permanent Things. (3 Mar 2015)

Congratulations to Bookman contributor Caleb Stegall, who was selected for a seat on the Kansas Supreme Court. We wish him all the best. (28 Dec 2014)

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