The University Bookman

 
 
The Classics Revisited 29 May 2011
book cover Conservation as a Conservative Concern
James E. Person Jr.
The Unsettling of America: Culture & Agriculture, 3rd edition, by Wendell Berry (Sierra Club Books, 1996; originally published in 1977), 234 pages.
Best of the Bookman 29 May 2011
Max Lerner’s America
Russell Kirk
In this “Best of the Bookman” essay, Russell Kirk amuses his readers with an acerbic review of a pretentious book, the 1957 third edition of Max Lerner’s America as a Civilization. Kirk’s critiques of a (literal) textbook case of liberalism are still worth serious reflection.
Interview 22 May 2011
book cover Conservatism, Journalism, and Pop Culture
an interview by Gerald J. Russello
A conversation with John J. Miller of National Review, soon to be heading the journalism program at Hillsdale College, and author, most recently, of The Big Scrum: How Teddy Roosevelt Saved Football.
Best of the Bookman 22 May 2011
The Big Life of Brownson
Robert Emmet Moffit
Orestes A. Brownson: A Definitive Biography by Thomas R. Ryan, C.PP.S. Huntington, Indiana: Our Sunday Visitor Press, 1976, 872 pages. ISBN 0879738847.
Review 18 May 2011
book cover You Have the Body
Gerald J. Russello
Habeas Corpus. From England to Empire by Paul D. Halliday. (Harvard University Press, 2010, 502 pp., $39.95)
Review 15 May 2011
book cover Two Cold Warriors
Francis P. Sempa
The Hawk and the Dove: Paul Nitze, George Kennan, and the History of the Cold War by Nicholas Thompson. Henry Holt and Company, 2009, ISBN: 978-0-8050-8142-8, pp. 403, $27.50
Best of the Bookman 15 May 2011
The Farewell Address Revisited
John Bowling
In this “Best of the Bookman” essay from 1982, Russell Kirk's friend John Bowling takes a careful look at George Washington's Farewell Address, offering a helpful summary of its concerns and a discussion of its origins and importance.
Essay 8 May 2011
book cover Poetry and the Common Language
Mark Anthony Signorelli
Signorelli argues that contemporary poetry's quest for natural, colloquial expression is fundamentally misdirected. Poetry truly is an "artificial" mode of narrative expression, which is necessary to rise above the debased rhetoric of the modern age. We do not stand in need of a return to nature; we need a return to art.
Best of the Bookman 8 May 2011
Christian Studies and the Liberal Arts College
Gerhart Niemeyer
This lecture from 1980 was given at the launch of the Christian Studies Institute at Hillsdale College. Niemeyer makes a strong case for the central place of belief, and more specifically of Christianity, in a liberal arts education. “A thinking person needs purpose and insight. If his liberal education has not prepared his mind for those ultimate questions, it has totally failed him.”
Review 2 May 2011
book cover Divine Faith, Human Faith
David Paul Deavel
John Henry Newman: A View of Catholic Faith for the New Millennium by John R. Connolly. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2005, pp. xviii+162. cloth $90; paper: $30.
Essay 1 May 2011
book cover Newman’s ‘Idea’ and the Crisis of the Secular University
Craig Bernthal
Craig Bernthal of California State University, Fresno, looks candidly at the current state of university education in light of John Henry Newman's enduring work, The Idea of the University. As Newman well knew, education has its own built in set of laws. The consequences for evading these laws may not long be avoided.
Best of the Bookman 1 May 2011
Resisting the Imperial Academy
Edward E. Ericson, Jr.
“To read Panichas is to be reminded what a noble thing conservatism is—and how little of it is promoted by most of the politicos who fly under its flag.”
Review 24 April 2011
book cover A Bold Music
Thomas F. Bertonneau
The Great American Symphony: Music, the Depression, and War by Nicholas Tawa (Indiana University Press, 2009), 256 pages, $25.
Best of the Bookman 24 April 2011
Discerning of Spirits
George A. Panichas
In this review from our archives, the late Dr. Panichas reviews a book on the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky and addresses reasons the great writer is misunderstood in the modern age.

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The moral imagination is the principal possession that man does not share with the beasts. It is man’s power to perceive ethical truth, abiding law, in the seeming chaos of many events. Without the moral imagination, man would live merely day to day, or rather moment to moment, as dogs do. It is the strange faculty—inexplicable if men are assumed to have an animal nature only—of discerning greatness, justice, and order, beyond the bars of appetite and self-interest.

Russell Kirk, Enemies of the Permanent Things, 1969

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The Edmund Burke Society of America is pleased to announce a call for papers and open registration for “Edmund Burke and Patriotism,” their third conference on Edmund Burke. It will be held on February 27 and 28, 2015 at Villanova University. Keynote addresses will be from David Bromwich, Michael Brown, and Regina Janes. Please see this link for details and to register. (27 Aug 2014)

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