Annette Y. Kirk

Annette Y. Kirk is president of the Russell Kirk Center for Cultural Renewal and publisher of the cultural quarterly The University Bookman. She is also director of the Wilbur Foundation residential Fellows Program.

Annette Y. Kirk

A native New Yorker, Mrs. Kirk moved to the village of Mecosta, Michigan in 1964 when she married Russell Kirk. While raising their four daughters and acting as lecture agent for her husband, she founded the Mecosta County Council for the Arts, restored a one-room schoolhouse, and served as Chairman of the Mecosta Country Board of Social Services.

Mrs. Kirk was a board member of the Midland Charter Initiative and the Education Freedom Fund, which awards scholarships to low-income students in Michigan Schools. She served for some years as an advisor to the Mackinac Center for Public Policy and to the Heritage Foundation’s Russell Kirk Memorial Lecture Series. In 2002 she was appointed to the board of the Laura Bush Foundation for America’s Libraries.

Annette Kirk received her Bachelor of Arts degree and an honorary doctor of letters from Molloy College. She taught English and Drama in a New York public high school and did graduate work in theater at Queen’s College, in literature at St. John’s University, and in education at Columbia University.

President Ronald Reagan appointed Annette Kirk to the National Commission on Excellence in Education, which in 1983 published the landmark report, A Nation at Risk, elevating educational issues to national prominence. Since then, she has encouraged our educational and political leaders to consider to what purpose we are educating our youth, and whether true education can exist without a moral dimension.

During her thirty-year marriage to Russell Kirk, they gave joint lectures, campaigned for political candidates, and hosted thousands of students at seminars held in The Russell Kirk Center library where Russell Kirk wrote almost all of his thirty-two books over a period of forty years.

Selected lectures by Annette Kirk

Kirk was convinced that in our age, the unimagined life is not worth living for a human being. He labored to reform our sensibilities, so that we could see ourselves both for what we are and for what we have become. He labored to make available an intellectual tradition of dissent from the modern age. He labored to release our hearts from the bondage of ideology.

Mark Henrie

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Highlights

Spring Permanent Things

The Spring 2014 number of our Permanent Things newsletter is up, featuring updates on recent events commemorating Russell Kirk and the strong reception in Brazil of the publication of The Politics of Prudence. You can download a copy of the PDF from this link.

Apr 2014

A new issue of Studies in Burke and His Time

SBHT23 Cover The Edmund Burke Society of America announces a new issue of their journal, Studies in Burke and His Time, Volume 23. The issue features articles on the theme of Burke and history. Articles from Joseph Pappin III, Jeffrey O. Nelson, Elizabeth Lambert, and Aaron D. Hoffman accompany several book reviews. The journal is being released as a PDF and is now available for download from our site. In the coming months, the Society will be releasing back numbers as well.

Mar 2014

The first Bookman e-book!

In honor of the great historian John Lukacs, who turns ninety in 2014, we are delighted to announce publication of the first e-book from the University Bookman. The Bookman on John Lukacs features essays and reviews by and about Lukacs gathered from fifty years of our archives. This convenient collection of scholarship is available as a Kindle edition from Amazon.com.

Feb 2014