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To the Point

Selections from Russell Kirk’s syndicated column that ran five days a week from 1962 to 1975 in 100 newspapers nationally via the Los Angeles Times Syndicate / General Features Corporation.

Reoccupying the City Winter 2017
Digging Up the Bones of Empire Fall 2016
The Genius of T. S. Eliot Spring 2016
An Encounter with Ayn Rand Winter 2016
The Meaning of Capitalism Fall 2015
Our Wisest President Fall 2015
Why Study Latin? Fall 2015
What’s Relevant? Roman History and Latin Literature Fall 2015
On Becoming a Journalist Fall 2015
Are Chance Acquaintances Providential Acquaintances? Fall 2015
Returning ‘To the Point’ Fall 2015
Derek Draplin has searched the archives for selections from Russell Kirk’s thirteen-year run as a syndicated columnist. Here he introduces what will be a periodic feature for the Bookman.

By 'the Permanent Things' [T. S. Eliot] meant those elements in the human condition that give us our nature, without which we are as the beasts that perish. They work upon us all in the sense that both they and we are bound up in that continuity of belief and institution called the great mysterious incorporation of the human race.

Russell Kirk

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News

We are pleased to announce the release of The University Bookman on Edmund Burke, now available for Kindle. Collecting 21 reviews, essays, and interviews from the Bookman on the life and thought of Edmund Burke, this book is only $2.99, and purchases support our ongoing work to provide an imaginative defense of the Permanent Things. (3 Mar 2015)

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