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Symposia

Online Symposia on critical issues of the times

Toward a Conservative Immigration Policy Winter 2017
by Yuval Levin
Symposium: Citizen, Community, and Welcoming the Stranger
Of Human Nature and the Obligations of the State Winter 2017
by Bruce P. Frohnen
Symposium: Citizen, Community, and Welcoming the Stranger
Universal and Territorial: The American Republic Winter 2017
by Peter Augustine Lawler
Symposium: Citizen, Community, and Welcoming the Stranger
We Want Workers, But We Must Form American Citizens Winter 2017
by Richard M. Reinsch II
Symposium: Citizen, Community, and Welcoming the Stranger
What Can the Declaration of Independence Teach Us About Immigration? Winter 2017
by David Azerrad
Symposium: Citizen, Community, and Welcoming the Stranger
Free Minds, Free Markets, and Free People Winter 2017
by Bradley J. Birzer
Symposium: Citizen, Community, and Welcoming the Stranger
The Proxy War Winter 2017
by Daniel McCarthy
Symposium: Citizen, Community, and Welcoming the Stranger
What We’re Reading (Summer 2016) Spring 2016
by Bookman Contributors
From Newman to MacArthur and children’s drama to philosophy and poetry, our contributors and friends again provide their summer reading lists.
What We’re Reading (Summer 2015) Spring 2015
by Bookman Contributors
From Waterloo to Palomar, from children’s fiction to philosophy, our contributors and friends again provide their summer reading lists.
The Pink Police State and Risk Summer 2014
by Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry
Second of two reflections on the “Pink Police State” thesis of James Poulos. Gobry sees severe risk-aversion behind the rise of the pink police state and suggests some possible responses.
The Worseness Accelerating Summer 2014
by J. Arthur Bloom
First of two reflections on the “Pink Police State” thesis of James Poulos. Bloom looks with some concern at the context in which Poulos’s “anthropological reform” must necessarily occur.
What We’re Reading (Summer 2014) Spring 2014
by Bookman Contributors
From medieval sagas to anti-Communist Japanese surrealist novels, the Civil War campaigns to contemporary fiction, our contributors and friends again provide their summer reading lists. Every year this is one of our most popular features, as the suggestions from our trusted contributors are learned, wide-ranging, and deeply engaged with the questions that face our modern age.
Reading Recommendations for 2014 Winter 2014
by Bookman Contributors
Contributors and friends of the Bookman share books of note from the past year’s reading in many different genres.
The Personalism of The Conservative Mind Summer 2013
by Bradley J. Birzer
Symposium: The Conservative Mind at 60
Reflections of a Conservative Liberal Summer 2013
by Drew Maciag
Symposium: The Conservative Mind at 60
What Is the Legacy of ‘The Conservative Mind’? Summer 2013
by W. Wesley McDonald
Symposium: The Conservative Mind at 60
Life Is Worth Living Summer 2013
by Lee Edwards
Symposium: The Conservative Mind at 60
The Joyful Conservative Summer 2013
by James E. Person Jr.
Symposium: The Conservative Mind at 60
A Problem of Definition Summer 2013
by Steven P. Millies
Symposium: The Conservative Mind at 60
The Deeper Roots of Social Order Summer 2013
by Bruce P. Frohnen
Symposium: The Conservative Mind at 60
An Excursion into the Broader World Summer 2013
by George H. Nash
Symposium: The Conservative Mind at 60
The Needs of Modernity’s Orphans Summer 2013
by Daniel McCarthy
Symposium: The Conservative Mind at 60
What We’re Reading (Summer 2013) Spring 2013
by Bookman contributors
We’re back with another collection of summer reading recommendations from our reviewers and friends.
Out of the Nursery to College, Back to the Nursery
by Robert M. Woods
A symposium on Fahrenheit 451. Robert M. Woods looks at Anti-Intellectualism and Authentic Learning in Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451
Running About with Lit Matches Spring 2013
by Ashlee L. Cowles
A symposium on Fahrenheit 451. Ashlee Cowles looks at the appeal to the moral imagination in Bradbury's work.
The Pulpy Roots of ‘Fahrenheit 451’ Spring 2013
by Thomas F. Bertonneau
A symposium on Fahrenheit 451. Thomas Bertonneau looks at themes and publishing history in Bradbury's short stories that led up to the great dystopia.
The Bookman goes back to school Summer 2012
by Bookman contributors
The University Bookman has long had a focus on education. Indeed, the archive reveals numerous reviews of college and high-school textbooks, and of course our founder Russell Kirk wrote often on education. As we approach the beginning of another school year, we asked some of our contributors for their advice to students coming back this fall on how to make the best of their education.
What We’re Reading (Summer 2012) Summer 2012
by Bookman contributors
As a special summer feature, we’ve asked our valued contributors to tell us what they’re planning to read this summer. We hope it provides you with ideas of your own.
Lukacs and Kennan: Reflections on a Friendship Fall 2011
by Lee Congdon
A Lukacs Symposium
The Awful Responsibility of Time Fall 2011
by Mark G. Malvasi
John Lukacs and the Problem of American History. A Lukacs Symposium.
John Lukacs as Teacher Fall 2011
by John P. Rossi
A Lukacs Symposium
John Lukacs: Biblical Historical Thinking Fall 2011
by Francesca Aran Murphy
A Lukacs Symposium
A Lukacs Symposium Fall 2011
by The Editors
Over the course of the week, we are publishing a series of essays on the life and achievement of historian John Lukacs, as well as a few items by him.
And the Tragedy Continues Summer 2011
by Bruce P. Frohnen
Symposium: Conservatism and Empire
How the GOP swallowed the Conservative Movement Summer 2011
by Paul Gottfried
Symposium: Conservatism and Empire
Empire and the Crisis of American Conservatism Summer 2011
by James Kalb
Symposium: Conservatism and Empire
Metternich vs. McEmpire Summer 2011
by Daniel McCarthy
Symposium: Conservatism and Empire
Is Conservatism Dead? Website Exclusives (2009)
by Joseph P. Duggan, Austin Bramwell, Daniel McCarthy, Lee Edwards, James Poulos, and Roger Kimball
A symposium in response to “Conservatism is Dead” by Sam Tanenhaus

To live with a gnawing grudge against one’s own civilization is the way to a personal Hell, not to a Terrestrial Paradise.

Russell Kirk

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Timothy D. Lusch

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From Hope to Hope: On the Mind of Man
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Bookman Contributors Elsewhere

Dan McCarthy has a review-essay on Patrick Deneen’s Why Liberalism Failed and William Galston’s Anti-Pluralism, newly published at The National Interest.

Titus Techera and Terry Teachout discuss Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo.

Allen Mendenhall in the Los Angeles Review of Books on slavery and the Supreme Court.

Crony capitalism: Our friends at The American Conservative are hosting a conference on this topic on June 21, 2018.

Gerald Russello reviews Roger Scruton’s new Conservatism: An Invitation to the Great Tradition for National Review.

George Nash gave a lecture on World War I and its legacy.

More …

News

We are pleased to announce the release of The University Bookman on Edmund Burke, now available for Kindle. Collecting 21 reviews, essays, and interviews from the Bookman on the life and thought of Edmund Burke, this book is only $2.99, and purchases support our ongoing work to provide an imaginative defense of the Permanent Things. (3 Mar 2015)

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