The University Bookman

 
 

Winter 2016

Editor’s Note

Conservatism in Disarray

We are pleased to present a review of Brad Birzer’s important book, Russell Kirk: American Conservative, and we will have more to say on the book in the future. Conservatism is in disarray. I write this in the aftermath of the Iowa caucus which followed weeks of infighting among both the conservative candidates and the conservative establishment. As yet, there is no candidate who has formulated a clear conservative vision for the country, placing the nation at risk to a loss to either a corporatist liberal or an avowed socialist.

Kirk would have seen the resent circumstance as a failure of imagination. Politics may be for the “quarter-educated,” as he once snapped, but it also can be an important way to organize our common life. Over more than two dozen books and thousands of essays and reviews, Kirk articulated what that common life might look like, drawing on the inherited intellectual and political tradition of the West. For some years, that tradition has been in the doldrums. And it is not untrue to say that, although there are exceptions, the nation is far more tenuously connected to the better parts of that tradition than it may ever have been. In this respect, the critique of “mainstream” conservatism has force; for many Americans, their world is less stable and less protective of their way of life than, say, in 1980. Kirk, who was never completely of that world, as Birzer explains, provides a counterpoint for a different conservative vision.

Birzer’s book is therefore especially welcome because it brings back into view not a political happy warrior, but a joyful Christian humanist. Kirk knew that all ages, even that of a seemingly omnipotent progressive liberalism, end. In this postmodern age, Kirk is finding a new generation of readers across the intellectual spectrum, longing for the permanent things. Birzer’s Kirk is in this sense an important instrument for renewal of conservatism, and also of the imagination Kirk so ably defended.  

Gerald J. Russello

Posted: February 2, 2016 in Editor’s Notes.

Did you see this one?

The Infinite Anguish of Free Souls
James V. Schall, S.J.
Volume 45, Number 3 (Fall 2007)

A spirit of innovation is generally the result of a selfish temper and confined views. People will not look forward to posterity who never look backward to their ancestors.

Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France

Share

Subscribe & Follow

RSS

More from the Bookman!

book cover book cover book cover


Transylvanian Dreams and Nightmares
Greg Morrison

A French Murder and Its Aftermath
Eve-Alice Roustang

Burning River: Glimpses from the Banks of the Cuyahoga
Will Hoyt

Treasures in the Garden
Matthew M. Robare

Books in Little: Philosophy for Life
Frank Freeman

Recovering Thoreau
John Byron Kuhner


book cover book cover book cover

News

We are pleased to announce the release of The University Bookman on Edmund Burke, now available for Kindle. Collecting 21 reviews, essays, and interviews from the Bookman on the life and thought of Edmund Burke, this book is only $2.99, and purchases support our ongoing work to provide an imaginative defense of the Permanent Things. (3 Mar 2015)

Other Sites of Interest

Publisher Sites

 

Copyright © 2007–2017 The Russell Kirk Center for Cultural Renewal