The University Bookman

 
 

Spring 2011

Contents

Editor’s Note: Taking Stock

Review 2 April 2011
book cover Santayana’s Liberty
by David A. Dilworth
The Genteel Tradition in American Philosophy and Character and Opinion in the United States by George Santayana, edited by James Seaton. Yale University Press, 2009. Paper, 240 pp. $16.
Editorial 2 April 2011
Taking Stock
by Gerald J. Russello
Interview 2 April 2011
book cover A Return to Reason
by Gerald J. Russello
A conversation with Robert Royal, president of the Faith & Reason Institute in Washington D.C. and author of The God That Did Not Fail on the place of the Catholic and Catholic teaching in American public life.
Review 2 April 2011
book cover Tyranny of the Herd
by Paul Beston
Bernard Iddings Bell’s Crowd Culture turned a withering eye on American conformity.
Review 2 April 2011
book cover A Bold Music
by Thomas F. Bertonneau
The Great American Symphony: Music, the Depression, and War by Nicholas Tawa (Indiana University Press, 2009), 256 pages, $25.
Essay 2 April 2011
book cover Newman’s ‘Idea’ and the Crisis of the Secular University
by Craig Bernthal
Craig Bernthal of California State University, Fresno, looks candidly at the current state of university education in light of John Henry Newman's enduring work, The Idea of the University. As Newman well knew, education has its own built in set of laws. The consequences for evading these laws may not long be avoided.
Review 2 April 2011
book cover Divine Faith, Human Faith
by David Paul Deavel
John Henry Newman: A View of Catholic Faith for the New Millennium by John R. Connolly. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2005, pp. xviii+162. cloth $90; paper: $30.
Essay 2 April 2011
book cover Poetry and the Common Language
by Mark Anthony Signorelli
Signorelli argues that contemporary poetry's quest for natural, colloquial expression is fundamentally misdirected. Poetry truly is an "artificial" mode of narrative expression, which is necessary to rise above the debased rhetoric of the modern age. We do not stand in need of a return to nature; we need a return to art.
Review 2 April 2011
book cover Two Cold Warriors
by Francis P. Sempa
The Hawk and the Dove: Paul Nitze, George Kennan, and the History of the Cold War by Nicholas Thompson. Henry Holt and Company, 2009, ISBN: 978-0-8050-8142-8, pp. 403, $27.50
Review 2 April 2011
book cover You Have the Body
by Gerald J. Russello
Habeas Corpus. From England to Empire by Paul D. Halliday. (Harvard University Press, 2010, 502 pp., $39.95)
Interview 2 April 2011
book cover Conservatism, Journalism, and Pop Culture
by Gerald J. Russello
A conversation with John J. Miller of National Review, soon to be heading the journalism program at Hillsdale College, and author, most recently, of The Big Scrum: How Teddy Roosevelt Saved Football.
The Classics Revisited 2 April 2011
book cover Conservation as a Conservative Concern
by James E. Person Jr.
The Unsettling of America: Culture & Agriculture, 3rd edition, by Wendell Berry (Sierra Club Books, 1996; originally published in 1977), 234 pages.
Review 2 April 2011
book cover From Materialism to Meaning
by Tobias J. Lanz
The Southern Critics: An Anthology edited by Glen Arbery. Wilmington, DE: ISI Press, 2010, 384 pp. paper, $22
Review 2 April 2011
book cover Pointless Protest of American Poetry
by Eugene Schlanger
Beautiful & Pointless: A Guide to Modern Poetry by David Orr. HarperCollins Publishers (New York, NY), 2011, xviii + 200 pp., $25.99
Review 2 April 2011
book cover The Dignity Conspiracy and its Strange Hold on Our Souls
by Richard M. Reinsch II
Modern and American Dignity: Who We Are as Persons, and What That Means for Our Future by Peter Augustine Lawler (ISI Books, 2010).
Review 2 April 2011
book cover When free trade is not fair exchange
by Derek Turner
How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly—and the Stark Choices Ahead by Dambisa Moyo. London: Allen Lane, 2011, paper, 226 pages
On Essays and Letters 2 April 2011
book cover Memories of Johnson
by James V. Schall, S.J.
Father Schall reflects on a collection of the writings and sayings—and conversations of Samuel Johnson. He suggests that “truth ultimately exists in conversation, not in books.”

The conservative believes that the individual is foolish, although the species is wise; therefore, unlike the confident intellectual, he declines to undertake the reconstruction of society and human nature.

Russell Kirk

Share

Subscribe & Follow

RSS

More from the Bookman!

Peter Lawler book cover book cover


Peter Augustine Lawler, RIP
Bruce P. Frohnen

Wilmer Mills: The Poet as Maker
Steven Knepper

‘It Was the End of Solo Singing’
Eve Tushnet

Thirteen Ways of Looking at Wallace Stevens
Daniel James Sundahl

American Imperialism and Its Discontents
Carl Rollyson

A Fine Closet of Curiosities
David J. Davis


book cover book cover book cover

News

We are pleased to announce the release of The University Bookman on Edmund Burke, now available for Kindle. Collecting 21 reviews, essays, and interviews from the Bookman on the life and thought of Edmund Burke, this book is only $2.99, and purchases support our ongoing work to provide an imaginative defense of the Permanent Things. (3 Mar 2015)

Other Sites of Interest

Publisher Sites

 

Copyright © 2007–2017 The Russell Kirk Center for Cultural Renewal