The University Bookman

Essay 19 April 2008
Sketches of Painterly Lives
James Panero
The Art of the Art Biography
Review 18 April 2008
The Man Who Built Ireland
David Campion
Kevin O’Higgins: Builder of the Irish State by John P. McCarthy. Irish Academic Press (Portland, Ore.), xvi/312 pp., $35.00 cloth, 2006
Review 18 April 2008
An Architect for all Purposes
Daniel McCarthy
Ralph Adams Cram: An Architect’s Four Quests: Medieval, Modernist, American, Ecumenical by Douglass Shand-Tucci. University of Massachusetts Press (Amherst), 624 pp., $49.95 cloth, 2005
Essay 18 April 2008
From the Nightstand of a Bookman . . .
Bruce Frohnen
Essay 18 April 2008
The State of Biography
Carl Rollyson
Editorial 18 April 2008
Editor’s Note: The Lives of Others
Essay 3 March 2008
William F. Buckley, RIP
Gerald J. Russello, Editor
Interview 3 February 2008
The Legacies of Edmund Burke and Robert Frost
an interview by James E. Person, Jr.
An Interview with Peter J. Stanlis
Review 22 January 2008
Recapturing the Moral Imagination through Scotland
David G. Bonagura, Jr.
The Sporran by G. L. Gregg (Butler Books, 2007, 275 pp.), $17.95.
Review 2 January 2008
Capitalism, Socialism, and Beyond
the Editors
Beyond Capitalism and Socialism: A New Statement of an Old Idea, Tobias Lanz, ed. (IHS Press, 2007, 234 pp.), $19.95.
Review 25 December 2007
Books in Little
The Editors
Essay 25 December 2007
A Tribute to Jacques Barzun on His Centennial
Tracy Lee Simmons
Essay 25 December 2007
The Infinite Anguish of Free Souls
James V. Schall, S.J.
On Essays and Letters
Essay 25 December 2007
The Moral Foundations of Economics
Russell Kirk
The following essay appears in the final chapter of Russell Kirk’s textbook Economics: Work and Prosperity (Pensacola, Fla.: A Beka Book Publications, 1989), pp. 365–368.

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The moral imagination is the principal possession that man does not share with the beasts. It is man’s power to perceive ethical truth, abiding law, in the seeming chaos of many events. Without the moral imagination, man would live merely day to day, or rather moment to moment, as dogs do. It is the strange faculty—inexplicable if men are assumed to have an animal nature only—of discerning greatness, justice, and order, beyond the bars of appetite and self-interest.

Russell Kirk, Enemies of the Permanent Things, 1969


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Bookman Contributors Elsewhere

Daniel McCarthy and the case for tariffs, in the New York Times.

William Anthony Hay had a prescient piece on Italy in 2011 in the National Interest.

Gerald Russello is featured on the Common Ground podcast from the Hauenstein Center, discussing the Bookman and conservative magazines.

Martyn Wendell Jones on Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker.

Stephen Presser has been named the visiting scholar of conservative thought and policy at the University of Colorado at Boulder for 2018–2019.

David Pietrusza appeared on C-Span to discuss his book, 1920: The Year of the Six Presidents.

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We are pleased to announce the release of The University Bookman on Edmund Burke, now available for Kindle. Collecting 21 reviews, essays, and interviews from the Bookman on the life and thought of Edmund Burke, this book is only $2.99, and purchases support our ongoing work to provide an imaginative defense of the Permanent Things. (3 Mar 2015)

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