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Best of the Bookman 27 March 2011
The Dark Ages of the Enlightenment
Peter J. Stanlis
In this “Best of the Bookman” essay from 1962, Peter J. Stanlis looks at a book on the thinking of the Enlightenment and its consequences for the present age. “In our time, as never before since Descartes, unbounded faith in the methodology of physical science in human affairs has become an end in itself.”
Review 20 March 2011
book cover Significance and Missteps
Adam Schwartz
Adam Schwartz looks at a recent intellectual biography of G. K. Chesterton that breaks new ground in the field, but also makes some significant missteps in interpretation.
Best of the Bookman 20 March 2011
book cover Wilhelm Roepke and the ‘Third Road’
Patrick M. Boarman
In this “Best of the Bookman” essay from 1977, Patrick Boarman presents a survey of the writings of Wilhelm Roepke (1899–1966), the German economist and antitotalitarian. He presents Roepke as a defender of the free market system but with a clear understanding of its limits—as a central twentieth century proponent, in fact, of a humane economy.
Interview 13 March 2011
book cover Democracy’s Immoderate Friends
an interview by Gerald J. Russello
A conversation with Daniel J. Mahoney, professor of political science at Assumption College and author of The Conservative Foundations of the Liberal Order, a new book that traces the intellectual history of democracy, and how its success may in fact rest on non-democratic values and norms developed in the Western tradition.
Best of the Bookman 13 March 2011
The Merging of Cultures
Gerhart Niemeyer
This review essay from 1975 from the late Notre Dame professor of political scientist looks at the historic role of Westernization in Russia and China. Did the importation or imposition of semirationality lead to the fall of these great cultures to totalitarianism?
Essay 6 March 2011
book cover The Public Responsibilities of Known American Poets
Eugene Schlanger
In this original essay, Gene Schlanger, the Wall Street Poet, reflects on the potential good of poetry in an age when the known poets cannot attract an audience or attention.
Best of the Bookman 6 March 2011
book cover The Great Historian of Culture
Russell Hittinger
Russell Hittinger reviews a biography of the Catholic historian Christopher Dawson in this “Best of the Bookman” from 1993.
Interview 27 February 2011
book cover The Quality of Our Imaginations
an interview by Gerald J. Russello
A conversation with Gary L. Gregg, director of the McConnell Center and author of a new series of young adult novels called The Remnant Chronicles. Gregg touches on the role of the imagination in his own work, the influence of Russell Kirk, and the connection between imagination and leadership as exemplified in the case of George Washington.
Review 27 February 2011
book cover Rescuing the Past
Isabel A. Nelson
The Iona Conspiracy by G. L. Gregg. Winged Lion Press, 2010, 432 pp., $18.
Best of the Bookman 27 February 2011
book cover The Faith of Men of Letters
George A. Panichas
In this review from 1987, the late Dr. Panichas reviews Russell Kirk’s book on Eliot—he calls it Kirk’s greatest work—and discusses the cultural role of “the man of letters.”
Review 27 February 2011
book cover Champion of Faith and Common Sense
James E. Person Jr.
Defiant Joy: The Remarkable Life & Impact of G. K. Chesterton by Kevin Belmonte. Thomas Nelson, 2011, $16.99, 318 pages
Review 20 February 2011
book cover Ortega y Gasset’s Metaphysical Cure for Invertebrate Cultures
Pedro Blas González
The Revolt of the Masses by José Ortega y Gasset. W. W. Norton, [1930] 1994, 192 pages.
Best of the Bookman 20 February 2011
book cover A Guide to Voegelin’s Thought
Gregory Wolfe
In this review published in the early 1980s, Gregory Wolfe looks at an early collection of essays on the work of the philosopher Eric Voegelin (1901–1985), who famously criticized ideological efforts to “immanentize the eschaton.” The essays offer a good introduction to the scope of Voegelin’s thought and the concerns of some critics.
Review 13 February 2011
book cover Terror and the ‘Market State’
Mitchell McNaylor
Terror and Consent: The Wars for the Twenty-First Century by Philip Bobbitt (New York: A. A. Knopf, 2008) x + 672 pp, $35.00 (cloth).

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A spirit of innovation is generally the result of a selfish temper and confined views. People will not look forward to posterity who never look backward to their ancestors.

Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France

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Bookman Contributors Elsewhere

John Lukacs —the great contemporary historian has pieces in both Chronicles (on being surrounded by books) and First Things (on a displaced pianist).

Joseph Bottom on fraud, American-style.

Andrew Bacevich on the end of endism.

Helen Andrews on the moon landing and the 1970s. Helen (a 2017 Robert Novak Journalism Fellow) wrote one of our most popular pieces, a consideration of the anti-suffragettes.

News

We are pleased to announce the release of The University Bookman on Edmund Burke, now available for Kindle. Collecting 21 reviews, essays, and interviews from the Bookman on the life and thought of Edmund Burke, this book is only $2.99, and purchases support our ongoing work to provide an imaginative defense of the Permanent Things. (3 Mar 2015)

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